Zhejiang Museum of Natural History
David Chipperfield 

Zhejiang Museum of Natural History

David Chipperfield 


The Zhejiang Museum of Natural History is the centerpiece of a new cultural area near Dipuzhen in eastern China, an area renowned for its extensive bamboo forests. The new museum is set on a sloping site in a large natural park overlooking rice fields in the valley below.

From a cultural and museological point of view, the museum operates in a similar way to the practice’s previous design for Liangzhu Museum, with single black box exhibition interiors offering adaptability for an undetermined collection including objects of varying scale. The emphasis is therefore placed on the building and its relationship to the landscape. A composition of eight single-story pavilions stepping down the hillside frame an open space conceived as a central garden. In total they respond to a twelve-meter difference in height between the northern and southern boundaries of the site. Their rectangular forms are set at right angles to the slope. A loggia, or covered walkway, reminiscent of classical cloisters, mediates between the central garden and the exhibition pavilions, between inside and outside. Green roofs spill over the edges of the building, reinforcing the relationship between the museum and landscape.


Obra Work

Zhejiang Museum of Natural History

Cliente Client

Zhejiang Museum of Natural History

Arquitectos Architects

David Chipperfield Architects, Shanghai; Mark Randel, Libin Chen (socios partners); Alessandro Milani, Miguel Angel, Shen Huiwen, Chuxiao Li (directores de proyecto project architects)

Colaboradores Collaborators

Zhejiang South Architecture Design (arquitecto de contacto contact architect); Levin Monsigny Landschaftsarchitekten, Architecture Design (paisajismo landscape architect); Arup, Zhejiang South Architecture Design (estructura structural engineer); Zhejiang South Architecture Design (instalaciones services engineer); Sunlux Lighting Design (iluminación lighting consultant)

Fotos Photos

Simon Menges